Roll with the grains

I love bread and rolls, especially homemade versions of both.  So when I stumbled across this recipe for multigrain rolls that included whole wheat flour, oats, and oat bran, I knew I had to make them. I have made them several times now, always freezing what I don’t need to reheat later with a subsequent meal.

The addition of nutrient packed seeds in this recipe really makes it that much better.  But let’s talk about the grains.  This recipe includes two types of whole grains – oats and wheat – and two different types of processes of oats.  These types are fascinating in their differences (a #youmightbeadietitiantobeif moment), and will be talked about in an upcoming post.  I wanted to delve into grains in general for this post, however.

The USDA recommendations for whole grains is at least 3 servings a day, or half of all the grains eaten.  A serving of grains would be equivalent to 1 slice of 100% whole wheat bread, 1/2 cup of cooked brown rice, whole wheat pasta or cooked cereal (like oatmeal) or 1 cup of ready-to-eat cereal. They actually have a very handy chart that lists which items are whole grains and how much is needed to equal a serving found here.

The reason for whole grains is that they contain more nutrients than the stripped down, regular grain version. Whole grains contain the germ, endosperm and bran part of the grain. They are higher in fiber, which reduces constipation, regulates blood sugar and dissuages the feeling of hunger.  They also contain multiple B vitamins, such as thiamin (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), and folate (B9), which help maintain healthy metabolism, nervous system, digestion and blood cell production. Whole grains are also one of the handful of sources of iron not from meat (non-heme).  Magnesium and selenium are also in higher density in whole grains.

When buying grain products, be sure to look at the first ingredient in the food to make sure it is a whole product (such as whole wheat). Other grains to consider adding to your diet besides oats and wheat are amaranth, quinoa, cous cous, buckwheat, wheat berries, brown rice, barley, spelt, teff and maize (corn). 

Multigrain Rolls

Printable Version

(From Annie’s Eats, which was adapted from Martha Stewart’s Baking Handbook)

Ingredients:
 
For the dough:
½ cup oat bran
¼ cup flax seeds
½ cup boiling water
1 cup warm milk (105-110˚ F)
2¼ tsp. instant (rapid rise) yeast
¼ cup honey
2 large eggs
2/3 cup old-fashioned (not instant) oats
7 oz. (1¼ cups) whole wheat flour
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
1 tbsp. salt
15 oz. (about 3 cups) all-purpose flour
Oil, for greasing the bowl
 
For the topping:
1 large egg
1 tbsp. water
2 tbsp. mixed seeds (poppy, sesame, fennel, etc.)
Coarse salt, for sprinkling

Directions:

Combine the oat bran and flax seeds in a small bowl.  Pour the boiling water into the bowl and mix to moisten.  Let sit until the water is absorbed, about 5 minutes.  Set aside to cool. Meanwhile, in the bowl of an electric mixer, combine the milk, yeast and honey; mix briefly to blend.  With the dough hook and the mixer on low speed, mix in the eggs, oats, wheat flour, pepper, salt and oat bran mixture until combined.  Slowly add enough all-purpose flour, ½ cup at a time, to make a soft, slightly sticky dough.  Continue to knead on medium-low speed, about 3 minutes.

Form the dough into a ball.  Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, turning once to coat.  Cover with plastic wrap or a clean kitchen towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk, about 1½-2 hours.

Brush a baking dish lightly with oil (I used a 10-inch round baking dish).  On a lightly floured surface, turn the dough out and divide into 16 equal pieces, about 2½ ounces each.  Form each portion into a ball and place the dough balls in the baking dish, spaced slightly apart so they have room to grow together.   Cover and let rise until puffy and nearly doubled in bulk, about 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 375˚ F.  In a small bowl whisk together the egg yolk and water.  Brush lightly over the proofed rolls.  Sprinkle the unbaked rolls with the seed mixture and coarse salt.  Bake until the tops are golden, about 26 minutes.  Let cool 10-15 minutes before removing from the pan.

Yield: About 32 small rolls or 16 large ones.

Nutritional Facts: (approximated, based on 32 small rolls, dependent on how much/type of seeds and salt you add on top of rolls)
Calories: 94; Fat: 1.6 g (0.3 g Sat, 0.7 g PolyUn, 0.5 g MonoUn); Cholesterol: 18 mg; Sodium: 300 mg; Potassium: 48 mg; Carbs: 17.2 g; Fiber 1.6 g; Sugars: 2.7 g; Protein: 3.3 g
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More than just a fungi

I love quiche. (Do you say key-shhh? Or ki- shhh?)  It can be made in so many different ways – sweet, savory, breakfast, dinner, brunch or mini!  Combining this variety with the fact that I love breakfast foods and often make them for dinner, this recipe was sure to be a winner in my book.

I have made a couple of quiches before, but the crust on this one really made it.  Plus, the ability to add different vegetables, more spices and make it my own really appealed to me.  Not to mention it was healthy!

The mushrooms take the highlight in this recipe (especially since they are part of the title).  Mushroom are fungus, but are a healthy fungus and come in various sizes and types – including some non-edible ones.  There are many types of mushrooms, but generally, they are an excellent source of selenium, various B vitamins, copper, potassium, and phosphorous.  Mushrooms are packed with phytonutrients and anti-oxidants to help you keep your immune system running well!

Mozzarella & Mushroom Quiche

(Source: adapted from The New Moosewood Cookbook by Mollie Katzen)

Ingredients:

Pie Crust:

  • 6 Tbsp. butter or margarine, cut into small pieces
  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • about 4 Tbsp. cold water, milk, or buttermilk

Filling:

  • 1 tsp. butter or margarine
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped onion
  • 1/4 lb. mushrooms, sliced or minced
  • 1/2 cup baby spinach
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • black pepper
  • a pinch of thyme
  • 1/2 tsp. dry mustard
  • 2 whole eggs plus 2 egg whites
  • 1 1/2 cups low fat milk
  • 1 tsp. hot sauce
  • 2 Tbsp. flour
  • 1 1/2 cups (packed) grated mozzarella cheese
  • 1 tomato, sliced
  • paprika

Directions:

For the crust:

  1. Use a pastry cutter, two forks, or a food processor to cut together the butter and flour until the mixture is uniformly blended and resembles coarse cornmeal. (The food processor will do this in just a few spurts.)
  2. Add just enough liquid (water, milk, or buttermilk) to hold the dough together (add more if absolutely needed, 1 tsp. at a time). Roll out the dough and form a crust in a 9- or 10-inch pie pan. Set aside.

For the filling:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Melt the butter in a small pan. Add onions, and saute over medium heat for a few minutes. When they begin to soften, add mushrooms, salt, pepper, thyme, and mustard. Saute about 4 minutes more. Add the spinach in for the last minute to just wilt the leaves. Remove from heat.
  3. Combine eggs, milk, hot sauce, and flour in a blender or food processor, and beat well.
  4. Spread the grated cheese over the bottom of the unbaked crust, and spread the onion-mushroom-spinach mixture on top. Pour in the egg mixture, top with the slices of tomato and sprinkle the top with paprika.
  5. Bake 35-45 minutes, or until solid in the center. Serve hot, warm, or at room temperature.